From Discourse

We Turned Three!

CX recently celebrated its third birthday. For three years we have been committed to navigating difficult issues, ranging from racial discrimination, to sexism, and cultural appropriation. For the past year we have been committed to creating a platform for young creatives to discuss popular culture, art, technology, and politics. Our writers have done so with…

A Note on Muhammad Ali and Inheritance

White supremacy has a remarkable way of erasing one’s links to their own history. Growing up Vietnamese in California, I always felt oddly disconnected from my ethnic heritage. It is a paradox familiar to many nonwhites raised in the United States: very rarely, if indeed ever, did the dry and empty narratives told in my…

Finding Harmony through Spirituality

And, while with silent, lifting mind I’ve trod The high untrespassed sanctity of space, Put out my hand, and touched the face of God. John Gillespie Magee, Jr   The cosmos often evoke a sense of awe and humility. On camping trips, I used to tilt my head back and watch the satellites on their…

An Open Letter on the Calhoun College Decision

Dear President Salovey, Have you ever reflected on how it might feel to go to school and be assigned to a residential college named for Joseph Goebbels? Would it be easy to ignore, or do you think it would rankle and weigh on you every single day? Would you be comforted by administration assurances that…

On Science and Racial Violence: A Letter to Lynn Cooley

Over the past month, students at Yale—among many other universities—have been in uproar after a range of racist behaviors, incidents, and comments on campuses across the nation. On Wednesday 18 November, Yale Dean Lynn Cooley hosted an open forum for graduate students to discuss issues of race, racism, and diversity. This letter, which has been…

On Race, Inheritance, and Struggle at Yale: An Open Letter to Erika Christakis

Associate Master Erika Christakis, My mother was one of many thuyền nhân Việt Nam. English-speaking historians might call her a “boat person,” which is as good a translation from the original as any. Among the Vietnamese, stories like hers wield great power, communicate great pain, and symbolize the great burdens of my ethnic heritage. After the…

Mobility as Power, Mobility as Privilege

I know a few people who never flew on a plane until their late teen or early adult years—not because they didn’t want to, but because their families never had the income to buy airfare for a family vacation. I’ve been mulling over this fact a lot ever since I was awarded my first research…

Evolution and Authenticity in the Other

For centuries, “modernity,” “progress,” and “civilization” have been racially loaded concepts, used not as actual ideals to be pursued, but as rhetorical constructs mobilized by colonial powers to highlight their presumed cultural superiority over Others. Historian Paul Kramer has examined how such concepts functioned in the Philippines, where Filipino elites had to draw, navigate, and…

Paranoid Liberalism: Saturday and the Clash of Civilizations

By Tyler C “So, not an attack on our whole way of life then.” —Ian McEwan, Saturday (2005). Samuel Huntington’s (1993) widely circulated and provocative text, “The Clash of Civilizations?,” predicted that “the great divisions among humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be cultural”(p. 1). This discourse quickly gained currency and legitimacy in…